Date published on SAFPI: 
Thursday, 8 November, 2012
Date published on source: 
Thursday, 8 November, 2012
Source organisation: 
The Star

Canberra backs KL for UN Security Council seat

Putrajaya:  Australia has thrown its support behind Malaysia to bid for a seat in the UN Security Council. Australian Foreign Minister Bob Carr said the UN would benefit hugely from what Malaysia could present to it. "Malaysia has an enormously strong case to sit in the engine room of the UN. I am honoured to say we will support Malaysia's candidacy for the Security Council in 2015/2016 term," he said after a courtesy call on Home Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Tun Hussein here yesterday.

Carr, who is on a four-day visit to Malaysia since Sunday, also thanked Malaysia for supporting Australia's candidacy for the Security Council. He also commended Malaysia's initiatives in combating human trafficking and the smuggling menace, describing the country as the Asian leader in the effort.

Hishammuddin meanwhile said the cooperation between both countries to tackle the issue had resulted in a decrease in the number of human smuggling and trafficking cases.

"Australia is the targeted point while Malaysia is the transit point. I am happy to say that there have been fewer attempts (to use the route). We both agreed that the number of cases had gone down," he said and added that the exact figures would be released later.

In an unrelated development, Hishammuddin said the under-utilised Langkawi International Shooting Range Malaysia (Lisram) would be turned into his ministry's data centre for foreigners. The shooting range, built for the 1998 Commonwealth Games, will be equipped with state-of-the-art data gathering and storage equipment and would include information such as name, age, sex and travel histories of each registered foreigner in the country.

Hishammuddin said the data includes the information collected through the recent 6P amnesty exercise. He added that Lisram would also be used as a training centre for the department.

| © The South African Foreign Policy Initiative 2012 | Developed by Octoplus